Inventory of the world's well-known "atomic tourism"

Whether it's a 320-foot deep pit left by the Nevada desert atomic bomb or a visit to the Arizona Titan II missile silo, the "Atomic Tourism" venues around the world can make visitors...

Whether it's a 320-foot pit in the Nevada desert atomic bomb or a visit to the Arizona Titan II missile silo, the “Atomic Tourism” sites around the world allow visitors to learn about history from the deadly consequences of the nuclear age and learn from it. .

The recent nuclear crisis in Japan has spurred interest in “atom tourism”, including nuclear-related museums and factories, the once-unknown Manhattan project complex, and areas that have been abandoned due to nuclear leaks.

Alan Palmer, managing director of the Las Vegas Atomic Bomb Museum and the Heritage Heritage Foundation of the Nevada Test Base, said: "The evidence shows that tourists are currently very interested in nuclear-related things and are particularly keen on Japan. Nuclear leakage status."

Last week, visitors to the Las Vegas atomic bomb test museum rose 12%. The museum is just a few minutes from the Las Vegas Strip.

Since the Fukushima First Nuclear Reactor was still in the process of treatment after the earthquake and tsunami, the number of tourists in northern Japan has decreased. The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, located in the Greater City of New Mexico, increased visitor visits by 20 percentage points over the weekend.

Janet Miller, a dialect of the Albuquerque Museum, said: "The public must want to get information about nuclear reactors and nuclear radiation."

When the Japanese nuclear leak occurred, it coincided with the start of the Ukrainian Chernobyl trip sponsored by the US government. The trip includes a visit to the Priopia of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and (the worst fashion nuclear power plant accident 25 years ago turned the city into a ghost town). Private business organizations Chernobyl travel began about a year ago, and visitors cost up to $250 per person.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan have museums covering war, reconstruction and peace efforts. The Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum and the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum provide visitors with detailed records, handicrafts and monuments.

Is virtual travel more attractive to you? The nuclear engineer Joseph’s website (nucleartourist.com) has seen a sharp increase in recent visits. Joseph said that in general, the site's traffic was 94,000, while the number of visitors in March increased by 119 percent.

More atomic travel destinations:

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Titan Missile Museum

Titan Missile Museum

The museum is the only one of the secret bases of the US Titan II missile silo that is open to the public. The museum is located approximately 20 miles south of Tucson, and visitors can participate in a tour group to enter the Titan II missile silo 35 feet underground to experience simulated launches.

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Albuquerque Museum

National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

The Albuquerque Museum witnessed the beginning of the atomic era, after the Cold War, and involved modern nuclear medicine, covering the secret trinity nuclear test in the New Mexico desert, with the big fat man and the little boy, two atomic bombs dropped by the United States in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. - The outer packaging features. Visitors can learn about the uranium cycle and the knowledge of “radiation 101”.

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Trinity Nuclear Test Site

Trinity Nuclear Test Site

The Trinity Nuclear Test Site was the site of the first atomic bomb explosion on July 16, 1945, at the northern end of the White Sands Missile Test Site in the south-central part of New Mexico. The 19-kilometer atomic bomb exploded the Pacific War, indicating the arrival of the atomic age. The White Sands Missile Test Site holds “open spaces” twice a year at the Trinity Nuclear Test Site, in April and July each year. This year will be held on October 1. For more details, please contact the Office of Public Affairs.

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Atomic Bomb Testing Museum

Atomic Bomb Testing Museum

The museum is a few minutes drive from the Las Vegas Strip. The museum includes the Nevada Atomic Bomb Test Base (now the National Security Base of China), which was tested for atomic weapons between 1951 and 1962.

From the museum to the test site, you need to travel 65 miles northwest from the city, but make an appointment six months in advance. Here, visitors can see the houses and bridges left after the experiment. The large number of deep pits after the explosion made the place as rugged as the moon's surface.

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American Science Energy Museum

American Science Energy Museum

Located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, it is another secret city for the Manhattan Project, which is responsible for providing fuel for the world's first atomic bomb explosion. The 20-minute short film in the museum provides an in-depth look at the history of Oak Ridge.

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